IMP Info

Latest things in Softwares,Freewares,Open Source,Internet,Programming…

Intel Pentium D 940 3.2GHz Dual Core Processor Review

Posted by Parth Barot on July 26, 2006

Built on Intel’s 65 nanometer manufacturing process and with two physical processing cores running at 3.2 GHz each, backed up by 2MB of L2 cache, the socket 775 chip certainly makes quite a splash.

It might have taken two years to do it, but Intel has firmly laid the Prescott fiasco behind itself. For those who are not familiar, Intel experienced huge manufacturing problems moving its Pentium 4 Netburst architecture from 130nm to the 90nm manufacturing process the ‘Prescott’ core was built on. An abnormally high voltage leak caused the Prescott core to draw a significant amount of power, and consequently it generated a lot of heat. The prompted Intel to look for a different architecture, and resulted in the cancellation of the ‘Tejas’ core which reportedly output more than 150W.

Fast forward to 2006 and the seas are much calmer for Intel and its 65 nanometer manufacturing process. It’s 65nm fab is up and running smoothly by all accounts and 40nm is even on the horizon. Multiprocessing remains entrenched, and four, eight or even 32 course on a single CPU seem to be projected for the future.

These changes to the way computer processors are used makes a lot of sense if we acknowledge that performance increases via stepped up megahertz clock speeds is no longer a viable option. In the absence of 4GHz to 4.2GHz speed increases, the industry has sought to mitigate CPU improvements by doubling up on processor cores, on one slab of silicon. Multiprocessing in and of itself is not a new idea, high end workstations and servers have long benefited from SMP (Symmetrical Multi Processing) going back to the days of the Cray computer. In recent times Intel first introduced Pentium 4 processors with a technology called Hyperthreading that created two logical cores from one. Then came the first generation of true dual physical core Intel Pentium D processors; a band aid fix by most accounts but none the less a good improvement to the P4. Intel’s latest generation of Pentium D processors are built on the 65 nanometer manufacturing process and include an increased amount L2 Cache which makes them even more competitive.

The Intel Pentium D 940 processor is the latest victim, errr…. component to pass through the PCSTATS test labs. Built on Intel’s 65 nanometer manufacturing process and with two physical processing cores running at 3.2 GHz each, backed up by 2MB of L2 cache, the socket 775 chip certainly makes quite a splash. The Pentium D 840 is more than ever a worthy competitor to AMD’s dual core Athlon64 processors. The Pentium D 940 processor runs on an 800 MHz Front Side Bus (FSB) and uses Intel’s pinless Socket 775 form factor. The retail processor is sold with a Pulse Width Modulation fan based heatsink that runs quietly and very effectively. If you’re an overclocker, there are plenty of after market thermal solutions to consider, like the ECT Prometeia Mach II GT phase change cooler that PCSTATS tested previously that will make reaching stratospheric clock speeds much simpler

Full Story @ PCSTATS.com

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Intel Pentium D 940 3.2GHz Dual Core Processor Review”

  1. Anonymous said

    anal! yaay!

  2. Anonymous said

    Hello, Your site is great. Regards, Valintino Guxxi

  3. they only wanna do you dir. Nurit Hailey.

  4. and i never thought, that we was gonna see each othe. Masood Garfield.

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: