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Archive for April, 2006

Xenoage Java Exe Starter

Posted by Parth Barot on April 27, 2006

In Java you can generate executable Jar-files. But most windows users are only familiar with Exe files. Moreover it is not possible to assign icons to a Java Archive. This program solves these problems by generating an Exe with an arbitrary icon, that starts the Jar when it is launched. You can also choose which JRE versions are allowed and you can pack the Jar into the Exe file so that you need only to deliver one single file.Xenoage Java Exe Starter is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

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Kodak Ships Tiny Bluetooth Camera

Posted by Parth Barot on April 27, 2006

Eastman Kodak has launched a new Bluetooth camera and new imaging software.
Kodak also explained its work in face-recognition technology to develop software that will automatically sort through thousands of photos to find pictures of friends or family. This is one of several technologies the company is working on in its labs, it explained.
EasyShare V610 revealed
The new camera—the Kodak EasyShare V610 dual lens digital camera—is the “world’s smallest 10X optical zoom camera,” the company claims. The 6-megapixel camera uses Bluetooth wireless technology, so camera users can send (or receive) images to any nearby Bluetooth device.
The camera combines two Schneider-Kreuznach C-Variogon all-glass, non-protruding prism lenses to deliver its long zoom range. The camera ships in June 2006 and costs 349.99 pounds (US$625).
The device will record TV-quality (VGA) video at 30 frames per second, using MPEG-4 compression for optimal quality and storage size. Built-in, video-specific image stabilization technology reduces on-screen shaking from unintentional hand and camera movement.
Alongside built-in image editing tools, the camera packs some powerful extra features, principally its in-camera panorama stitching mode, which will automatically combine three pictures into a panoramic photograph without the need for a computer.
There’s also a favorites mode, which places approximately 100 favorite pictures onto an on-camera album for instant retrieval and sharing anytime, anywhere.
More @ Here

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Seagate Intros Monster HD

Posted by Parth Barot on April 27, 2006

Record-setting drive comes in at 750GB as company continues a shift to perpendicular recording.
Seagate on Wednesday announced the biggest desktop hard drive ever—a 750GB version of its Barracuda model, fulfilling a pledge to have most of its products use the industry’s new perpendicular recording technology by the end of the year.
The news is the latest in a string of product announcements made by the company in the past several months. Since January, Seagate has unveiled perpendicular upgrades to its 1-inch ST1 drives (12GB), 2.5-inch Momentus notebook drives (160GB), and the Cheetah line (300GB), designed for enterprise customers.
Perpendicular recording packs more information on disk drives by arranging bits of data vertically rather than horizontally. The innovation eventually could lead to a fivefold increase in the capacities of traditional drives.
“750 gigabytes, for us, is just scratching the surface,” said Seagate spokesperson Mike Hall. “We’re driving toward… 2.5 terabytes.”
High Performance

The current iteration of the Barracuda family, dubbed 7200.10, features 7,200-RPM drives in varying capacities. They will be targeted at PC users craving performance, whether for video editing, high-end gaming, or external storage.
The drives could also see use in digital video recorders and some enterprise storage applications. According to Mr. Hall, the company plans to announce an external version of the drive featuring a push-button backup feature next week.
The announcement has several high points, said iSuppli analyst Krishna Chander. In addition to the drive’s record-setting capacity, the move gives Seagate the honor of being the first hard drive manufacturer to introduce a desktop drive featuring perpendicular recording.
More @ Here

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Learn CSS Positioning in Simple Steps

Posted by Parth Barot on April 24, 2006

This tutorial examines the different layout properties available in CSS: position:static, position:relative, position:absolute, and float.

1. position:static

The default positioning for all elements is position:static, which means the element is not positioned and occurs where it normally would in the document.
Normally you wouldn’t specify this unless you needed to override a positioning that had been previously set.

		#div-1 {
		 position:static;
		}

2. position:relative

If you specify position:relative, then you can use top or bottom, and left or right to move the element relative to where it would normally occur in the document.
Let’s move div-1 down 20 pixels, and to the left 40 pixels:

		#div-1 {
		 position:relative;
		 top:20px;
		 left:-40px;
		}

Notice the space where div-1 normally would have been if we had not moved it: now it is an empty space. The next element (div-after) did not move when we moved div-1. That’s because div-1 still occupies that original space in the document, even though we have moved it.

It appears that position:relative is not very useful, but it will perform an important task later in this tutorial.

3. position:absolute

When you specify position:absolute, the element is removed from the document and placed exactly where you tell it to go.
Let’s move div-1a to the top right of the page:

		#div-1a {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 right:0;
		 width:200px;
		}
		

Notice that this time, since div-1a was removed from the document, the other elements on the page were positioned differently: div-1b, div-1c, and div-after moved up since div-1a was no longer there.

Also notice that div-1a was positioned in the top right corner of the page. It’s nice to be able to position things directly the page, but it’s of limited value.

What I really want is to position div-1a relative to div-1. And that’s where relative position comes back into play.
Footnotes

* There is a bug in the Windows IE browser: if you specify a relative width (like “width:50%”) then the width will be based on the parent element instead of on the positioning element.

4. position:relative + position:absolute

If we set relative positioning on div-1, any elements within div-1 will be positioned relative to div-1. Then if we set absolute positioning on div-1a, we can move it to the top right of div-1:

		#div-1 {
		 position:relative;
		}
		#div-1a {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 right:0;
		 width:200px;
		}
		

5. two column absolute

Now we can make a two-column layout using relative and absolute positioning!

		#div-1 {
		 position:relative;
		}
		#div-1a {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 right:0;
		 width:200px;
		}
		#div-1b {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 left:0;
		 width:200px;
		}
	

One advantage to using absolute positioning is that we can position the elements in any order on the page, regardless of the order they appear in the HTML. So I put div-1b before div-1a.

But wait – what happened to the other elements? They are being obscured by the absolutely positioned elements. What can we do about that?
6. two column absolute height

One solution is to set a fixed height on the elements.

But that is not a viable solution for most designs, because we usually do not know how much text will be in the elements, or the exact font sizes that will be used.

		#div-1 {
		 position:relative;
		 height:250px;
		}
		#div-1a {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 right:0;
		 width:200px;
		}
		#div-1b {
		 position:absolute;
		 top:0;
		 left:0;
		 width:200px;
		}

7. float

For variable height columns, absolute positioning does not work, so let’s come up with another solution.

We can “float” an element to push it as far as possible to the right or to the left, and allow text to wrap around it. This is typically used for images, but we will use it for more complex layout tasks (because it’s the only tool we have).

		#div-1a {
		 float:left;
		 width:200px;
		}
	

8. float columns

If we float one column to the left, then also float the second column to the left, they will push up against each other.

		#div-1a {
		 float:left;
		 width:150px;
		}
		#div-1b {
		 float:left;
		 width:150px;
		}
	

9. float columns with clear

Then after the floating elements we can “clear” the floats to push down the rest of the content.

		#div-1a {
		 float:left;
		 width:190px;
		}
		#div-1b {
		 float:left;
		 width:190px;
		}
		#div-1c {
		 clear:both;
		}
		

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Seagate Debuts Perpendicular Drives

Posted by Parth Barot on April 19, 2006

Seagate on Tuesday announced its first 3.5-inch hard disk drives to use perpendicular storage technology. The new offerings join the company’s preexisting line of Cheetah drives that sport some of the fastest data transfer rates of any hard disk available.
The drives will sport data transfer rates of 73 to 125 mbps, 30 percent faster than their predecessor. Capacities of 73GB, 147GB and 300GB would be available on one, two, and four platters, respectively. Seagate is betting on perpendicular technology as a way to fit more disk capacity into a standard-sized drive.
Today’s hard drives store data lengthwise across the hard-disk platter. However, with storage demands increasing, that method is meeting its limitations.
Hard disk makers say that the laws of physics will soon prevent bits of data from being stored any closer together, meaning standard drives will hit a ceiling in terms of storage capacity before their size must be increased.
In comparison, perpendicular recording drives store data like their name implies — perpendicular to the disk platter. This method provides two benefits, say supporters. First, data is able to be stacked closer together, allowing for higer capacity. Second, data is more easily accessible, thus allowing drives with faster data transfer rates.
The Cheetah drives would be the second line of perpendicular drives from the company. Seagate began shipping its Momentus 2.5-inch drives last month in sizes ranging from 30GB to 160GB. A 1-inch drive with perpendicular recording was also introduced at 3GSM in February.
Source:www.betanews.com

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Xvid 1.1.0 released

Posted by Parth Barot on April 19, 2006

Xvid 1.1.0 released


This is XviD 1.1.0 release.


This release is the long awaited 1.1.0. It is mostly API compatible with the previous stable release as we dropped support for reduced resolution coding. If your application didn’t use that feature then the upgrade is totally compatible.


Changes since 1.0.3:


 xvidcore:
  Improved Low bitrate quality.
  Improved VBV support
  Rate-Distortion mode decision for bvops
  New postprocessing functions, brightness and deringing
  New PowerPC port by Christoph Naegeli
  Brand new amd64 Linux 64bit port by Andre Werthmann
  Various decoder and encoder speedups
  A few bugs squashed
 VFW frontend
  Mingw/CygWin support
  Various small improvements
  A few bugs squashed
 DShow frontend
  Mingw/CygWin support
  Support for brightness control
  Various small improvements
  A few bugs squashed


Changes since 1.1.0-beta2:


 xvidcore
  Field interlaced decoding
  IEEE-1180 compliant SSE2 iDCT (disabled for safety)
  Fixed misaligned reads on RISC platforms such as ARM
  Completed GCC 4.0 support
  Export only public API on GNU/Linux and Solaris
  Work on the example apps. Support for AVS input in xvid_encraw
 VFW frontend
  Small updates
 DShow frontend
  Additional fourcc support
  


Link:Koepi’s Xvid 1.1.0
or simply search “Koepi”/”xvid” in google and you are there!

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Choose Proper Audio Format for DivX Video…

Posted by Parth Barot on April 13, 2006

Basically, most people use default mp3 128/96 kbps constant bitrate for Divx movie files.It is good in quality but of big size.
What i mean is, suppose your video is only some speech in the file then you need higher kbps enough to hear.when it is music or say some fast sequence in film then you need better quality andperfect sound.In CBR (Constant Bit Rate), it is constant at all the moments of file. In VBR (Variable Bit Rate), the algoritham decides what to do and what should be the quality for specific sequence.It lowers somewhat which is not needed in higher music which doen’t affect you and it highers the audio when it needs to be hear perfect sound in speech.

And if you don’t want to use mp3 then you can use ogg as yur audio format.It is free as well as good quality and less size.
Tools needed for video/audio conversion
1.VirtualDub/FlaskMpeg
2.lamecodec(mp3)/ogg codec
3.oggmux(To mix mute video and ogg file to make .ogm)

All these can be found on http://www.doom9.org

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Get A Free Domain With Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta

Posted by Parth Barot on April 12, 2006

Believe it or not Microsoft is offering a free domain name with hosts of other features when you signup for Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta. Fortunately Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta is also free.
With Microsoft Office Live Basics Beta you get:
Your own domain nameEasy-to-use design toolsFive e-mail accountsWeb site traffic reports
But the only catch is that you need to provide your credit card details, though you wont be charged for it.
Go get your free domain here

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The Basics Of DSL Internet Service

Posted by Parth Barot on April 4, 2006

The days of unreliable Internet connections, impatiently waiting for web pages to load, and waiting hours to download something from the Internet are quickly becoming obsolete. Dial-up Internet, which used to be the standard for those seeking Internet access, is rapidly being replaced by faster, more reliable Internet access technologies. One of those technologies, DSL Internet service, is one of the most popular and affordable options for the home Internet customer. There are things to be aware of though, if you are considering using DSL for your Internet access.

DSL, or digital subscriber line, is a form of broadband Internet technology, that has download speeds that span 128 Kbps (Kilobits per second) to 24,000 Kbps, depending on the level of service purchased by the customer and the particular DSL technology in use by the ISP (Internet service provider). The technology dates back to 1988, when engineers at Bellcore (formerly Bell Communications Research, Inc., now Tellcordia Technologies) developed a method of transmitting a digital signal along the unused frequency spectrum on the twisted pair cables that ran between the central office (in a phone company, the location that houses the equipment that connects phone calls) and customer locations. Using DSL allowed a regular telephone line to provide digital (Internet) service without getting in the way of existent telephone service on the line.

DSL did not take off immediately, because it was more profitable for local telephone companies to simply install a second phone line in a home in order to provide dial-up Internet service in addition to regular telephone service. However, when cable television companies began offering and implementing their new high-speed Internet technology (via cable modems) nearly a decade later, local telephone carriers jumped in with the competition and began offering up the DSL technology to customers. Today, DSL remains the primary competition for cable companies and their high-speed Internet technology.

Despite the more reliable connections and faster rates of data transmission, there are some potential drawbacks to be aware of regarding DSL Internet service. For starters, the farther your house is from the telephone company’s central office, the less bandwidth you will have access to. This means slower data transmission rates, and therefore might mean less enjoyment for things like online gaming, video viewing, and picture uploading. Some might not notice the slower capacity for things like email and other basic uses, though.

Another drawback to DSL is the potential cost. There is equipment to purchase, such as the modem and DSL router, plus there are sometimes installation fees. The good news is that competition drives service providers to often offer incentives and freebies for choosing their services, such as free self-installation, rebates for equipment purchases, and large amounts of mailbox storage. However, if you are not satisfied with your DSL service, you are often contractually obligated to them for a certain period of time, and will probably be required to pay a hefty fee for canceling early (up to $200 sometimes). Monthly prices for DSL Internet service range from $14.95 per month for basic DSL to upwards of $49.96 per month for more advanced versions of the technology.

Yet another drawback to DSL Internet service is that customers often see a slower connection than promised by the ISP. This is due to some service providers oversubscribing their service. Their often just isn’t enough bandwidth to go around. But ISP’s make the argument that all of their customers are never online at the same time. This can be particularly frustrating for businesses using DSL that rely heavily on the Internet for their daily dealings.

Don’t let the drawbacks keep you from exploring the possibility of DSL Internet service. As with any new technology, there are kinks, and ISP’s work on a regular basis to make service to their customers faster and more reliable. There are also many ISP’s that offer DSL for you to choose from, so the incentives and promotions for picking one over another can mean saving money and getting more extras. Though it can be frustrating and seem costly, DSL Internet service is still a more cost effective option than some of the other types of broadband Internet service, such as satellite Internet.

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Important Linux Directories

Posted by Parth Barot on April 4, 2006

There are many variants of Linux used in different computer systems today. Luckily, most Linux developers employ a common naming and utilization scheme that makes different variants of Linux easy to use and maintain. This article will discuss some important and common directories in many popular Linux distributions.

/home

Each user of a Linux system is assigned a special directory, called “home” direectory, that represents their private space on the system. For example, if a user of the system is called tom, the home directory of tom will be /home/tom. Tom has the right to create any files and directories under his home directory. This is also the default location when tom logs into the system.

/root

This is the home directory of the adminstrator or super user.

/tmp

In addition to personal hard disk space in the home directories, users are also given special access to shared temporary space in the /tmp directory. Linux systems often implement quotas on user accounts to prevent anyone from using too much disk space. The /tmp directory allows all users access to additional space to meet short term needs without charging the space against their quota. All files placed in this directory are deleted automatically after a few days.

/etc

This directory stores all the configuration files needed for the operating system. For example, startup configuration scripts are found in /etc/rc.d and network configuration scripts are found in /etc/sysconfig. Normal users cannot modify the files in /etc./bin and /usr/bin

Most system commands are stored as binary files only in machine readable format. Commands appropriate for use by ordinary users are either placed in the /bin or /usr/bin directory. Core commands like rm, mv, ls, cd go into /bin while supplementary utilities like compilers, firefox browser and openoffice go into /usr/bin.
/sbin and /usr/sbin
Like /bin and /usr/bin, /sbin and /usr/sbin store commands to be used only by the super user, ie root user. These include commands for attaching and removing hardware, starting and stopping the system…etc.
/var
This directory stores all the frequently changed files in the system. For example, incoming, outgoing mails, system logs, websites, ftp file archives…etc. very
Conlcusion
There are only a few directories to know to really start using Linux. If you understand what the main directories are, then exploring the sub-direectories becomes much easier. If you are lost while navigating the directories, always use “cd /” to return back the the root, “cd ..” to go up one level or use “pwd” to find out where you are. Another command “which xxx” tells you where certain commands are located.

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